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Mother who had double-hand transplants thanks Prince William for raising awareness to her charity 

A mother who became one of the first people in the UK to have a double hand transplant has thanked Prince William for raising awareness of her charity to support amputees. 

Cor Hutton, 50, from Renfrewshire, was the first patient in Scotland and the third in the UK to successfully have the procedure, after having both her hands and feet amputated in 2013 when she fell ill with acute pneumonia and sepsis, which nearly killed her.

In May last year, she chatted with the Duke of Cambridge after her organisation Finding Your Feet benefited from emergency grants from the National Emergencies Trust, to help cope with the Covid crisis. 

Appearing on Lorraine today, she told how ‘kind and complimentary’ William was during the call, and how important it is for the charity to raise awareness. 

Cor Hutton, 50, (pictured) from Renfrewshire, was the first patient in Scotland to have a double hand transplant

Cor Hutton, 50, (pictured) from Renfrewshire, was the first patient in Scotland to have a double hand transplant

She underwent the 12-hour operation in 2019 after having both her hands and feet amputated in 2013 after suffering acute pneumonia and sepsis which nearly killed her. Pictured Cor in hospital

She underwent the 12-hour operation in 2019 after having both her hands and feet amputated in 2013 after suffering acute pneumonia and sepsis which nearly killed her. Pictured Cor in hospital

She said: ‘He was very kind actually, very complimentary – made me blush! But it was great to get the nod there and a bit of notice of the charity. 

‘It could help us find another amputee, it could help find us another cooperation invest, another grant, its all really important.’  

Finding Your Feet works to provide physical and emotional support to individuals and families who have been affected by amputation or limb absence. 

In 2018, before Cor underwent her hand transplants, Cor became the first female quadruple amputee to reach the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro in aid of the charity. 

In May last year, she and other charities chatted with the Duke of Cambridge after her organisation Finding Your Feet benefited from emergency grants from the National Emergencies Trust

In May last year, she and other charities chatted with the Duke of Cambridge after her organisation Finding Your Feet benefited from emergency grants from the National Emergencies Trust

‘That’s really my job,’ said Cor. ‘To encourage them to climb their own mountains, they don’t have to do what I wanna do. 

‘But for some of them, its a mountain to get out of bed in the morning, to make that phone call, join that club. ‘ 

Cor underwent the 12-hour operation on January 9 2019, and says she will forever be grateful for her donor.  

She said: ‘I’m quite pleased that no matter how much I am celebrating, how kind everyone has been congratulating me, there is always the same conversation in my head. 

Appearing on Lorraine today, she told how 'kind and complimentary' William was during the call, and how important raising awareness to the charity is

Appearing on Lorraine today, she told how ‘kind and complimentary’ William was during the call, and how important raising awareness to the charity is

'It could help us find another amputee, it could help find us another cooperation invest, another grant, its all really important', she told host Lorraine Kelly (pictured left)

‘It could help us find another amputee, it could help find us another cooperation invest, another grant, its all really important’, she told host Lorraine Kelly (pictured left) 

‘There is another family with a very different experience, and I will always be aware of that and never forget her and how brave she was to make that decision.’ 

It took Cor five years to find a match, because doctors had to find hands with a physical resemblance as well as a donor with a blood match.  

‘With hands there is also the physical match’, said Cor, ‘I didn’t want to be sexist or racist or ageist – but they want the best match they can get and they’ve got it, these hands belong to me, they’re just fantastic, they’ve got a great match.’ 

In 2018, before Cor she underwent her hands transplant, Cor became the first female quadruple amputee to reach the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro in aid of the charity. She is pictured putting on her prosthetic legs

In 2018, before Cor she underwent her hands transplant, Cor became the first female quadruple amputee to reach the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro in aid of the charity. She is pictured putting on her prosthetic legs 

Cor has had near ‘perfect’ results with her hands, but told how ‘lucky’ she was last year to notice the psychical signs of her body rejecting her transplant. 

‘I’m on medication for the rest of my life, I had a bit of a rejection on New Year.  I’ve had perfect results with my hands, it was just at New Year I had a bit of a rejection. 

‘Because its physical you can see straight away the early warning signs that an organ transplant would not get, they would just feel sick.

‘I’m very lucky I got that warning and was able to take a very big dose of steroids to allow my body to accept the hands again.’ 

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